فهرست مطالب

  • Volume:18 Issue: 65, 2019
  • تاریخ انتشار: 1398/05/17
  • تعداد عناوین: 10
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  • Niloofar Chitsaz, Leila Dehghani, Amir Safi, Nazgol Esmalian Afyouni, Vahid Shaygannejad, Majid Rezvani, Karim Sohrabi, Kaykhosro Moridi, Milad Moayednia* Pages 150-153
    Background

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are both demyelinating disorders and oxidative stress is suggested to have a role in their pathogenesis. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) via the pentose phosphate pathway. NADPH is not only involved in the synthesis of fatty acids necessary for myelination, but also it is involved in the defense against oxidative stress. Prescribing supplementary vitamin D as a part of the MS treatment plan can increase G6PD gene expression. The aim of this study was to determine the serum level of G6PD in patients with MS and NMO and its relationship with vitamin D, since it is yet to be explored thoroughly.

    Methods

    In this case-control study, subjects were divided into three experimental and control groups. The experimental groups comprised 50 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) who had a history of vitamin D consumption, 50 newly-diagnosed MS patients, and 50 patients with NMO. Control group included 65 healthy individuals. Serum level of G6PD was measured and compared among these groups.

    Results

    No significant difference was seen between the G6PD level in patients with MS and NMO, but it should be noted that this level was significantly lower than the healthy group. G6PD serum level was significantly higher in patients with MS who had previously consumed supplementary vitamin D compared to those who had not.

    Conclusion

    G6PD deficiency is observed in patients with MS and NMO. Also, supplementary vitamin D may induce favorable results on the G6PD level.

    Keywords: Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica, Vitamin D, Oxidative Stress, Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase
  • Mohsen Foroughipour, Sahar Gazeran* Pages 154-158
    Background

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurologic disorder with a considerable global burden. During the last decades, some pharmaceutical treatments have been approved for patients with MS. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is one of these drugs which has been reported to have early promising results in recent studies, but the efficacy of this drug in patients with MS is still being studied in different parts of the world. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of DMF therapy on reducing relapses, lesions, and disability in Iranian patients with MS.

    Methods

    The present single-arm before-after study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran [Iranian Registry of Clinical Trial (IRCT) code: IRCT20190121042439N1]. Every patient who was diagnosed with relapsing MS was considered eligible to enroll in the present clinical trial. Before receiving DMF therapy, the baseline liver function tests and complete blood count were obtained from all individuals. Also, a baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was documented from all patients. After receiving 240 mg DMF twice daily for 12 months, the laboratory and imaging measurements as well as EDSS were repeated. Furthermore, the total number of relapses within the study period was recorded. Satisfaction with DMF treatment was determined by answering a yes-no question.

    Results

    A total number of 50 patients enrolled in the study and most of them were female (80%). There was a significant decrease in EDSS score and gadolinium (GD)-enhancing lesions after the study period (P < 0.001 for each). Moreover, the attacks significantly dropped after the study period (P < 0.001) and 86% of patients were satisfied with their treatment.

    Conclusion

    The findings of this study showed that 240 mg DMF administered twice daily can effectively reduce disability and provide satisfaction within the first year of therapy in patients with MS.

    Keywords: Multiple Sclerosis, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Dimethyl Fumarate
  • Nasim Tabrizi* Pages 159-171

    Driving restriction is a well-known undesirable consequence of epilepsy and causes significant problems regarding independence and employment for epileptic patients. Many countries all over the world have provided comprehensive protocols in this regard with the aim of providing the possibility of less restricted, but safe driving for epileptic patients and also providing the opportunity for uniform decision-making for clinicians. However, the available fitness to drive protocol in Iran still lacks sufficient details and clinicians might encounter serious problems in terms of the driving issue in epileptic patients. In order to provide a uniform protocol containing adequate practical data, a systematic review of literature addressing guidelines about driving and epilepsy and driving laws of different countries for epileptic patients was performed and, after consideration of cultural issues, a practical protocol for Iranian neurologists was suggested.

    Keywords: Seizures, Epilepsy, Drive, Clinical Protocol, Iran
  • Sara Esmaeili, Motahareh Afrakhteh, Maryam Bahadori, SeyedehFahimeh Shojaei, Rezan Ashayeri, Masoud Mehrpour* Pages 172-175
    Background

    A number of patients with symptoms of acute cerebral ischemia may have other causes called stroke mimics (SM). The prevalence of SM can be as high as 31% in some reports, and these patients are potentially at the risk of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) therapy and its complications. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of our center ’s SM among patients who received IVT, their baseline characteristics, final diagnoses, and outcomes.

    Methods

    We reviewed the medical records of all patients who received IVT between June 2015 and November 2017. The following variables were collected: demographic characteristics, past medical history, onset-to-needle (OTN) time, door-to-needle (DTN) time, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission, brain imaging, and all paraclinic findings. Functional outcome at discharge based on modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was also assessed.

    Results

    12 out of 165 (7.1%) patients including 8 men and 4 women were finally diagnosed with SM. The median age and NIHSS score at presentation were 60 years and 7, respectively. Final diagnoses were seizure (n = 6), hemiplegic migraine (n = 2), conversion (n = 1), and alcohol intoxication (n = 1). All patients were discharged with a mRS score of 0 and 1 without experiencing any thrombolytic adverse effects.

    Conclusion

    None of the patients with SM experienced any adverse effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) including hemorrhage and all of them reached good mRS score. This shows that tPA is generally safe and the risk of treating patients with SM is very low and making a vital treatment decision may outweigh the risk of neglected cases in a time-sensitive setting.

    Keywords: Thrombolytic Therapy, Stroke, Iran
  • Gulcin Benbir Senel*, Ayse Elmali, Kaveh Mehrvar, Mehdi Farhoudi, Mohammad Aboutalebi, Mahsa Rezaei, Birsen Ince Pages 176-178
    Background

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurologic disorder with a considerable global burden. During the last decades, some pharmaceutical treatments have been approved for patients with MS. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is one of these drugs which has been reported to have early promising results in recent studies, but the efficacy of this drug in patients with MS is still being studied in different parts of the world. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of DMF therapy on reducing relapses, lesions, and disability in Iranian patients with MS.

    Methods

    The present single-arm before-after study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran [Iranian Registry of Clinical Trial (IRCT) code: IRCT20190121042439N1]. Every patient who was diagnosed with relapsing MS was considered eligible to enroll in the present clinical trial. Before receiving DMF therapy, the baseline liver function tests and complete blood count were obtained from all individuals. Also, a baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was documented from all patients. After receiving 240 mg DMF twice daily for 12 months, the laboratory and imaging measurements as well as EDSS were repeated. Furthermore, the total number of relapses within the study period was recorded. Satisfaction with DMF treatment was determined by answering a yes-no question.

    Results

    A total number of 50 patients enrolled in the study and most of them were female (80%). There was a significant decrease in EDSS score and gadolinium (GD)-enhancing lesions after the study period (P < 0.001 for each). Moreover, the attacks significantly dropped after the study period (P < 0.001) and 86% of patients were satisfied with their treatment.

    Conclusion

    The findings of this study showed that 240 mg DMF administered twice daily can effectively reduce disability and provide satisfaction within the first year of therapy in patients with MS.

    Keywords: Cerebrovascular Stroke, Risk Factors, Etiology, Turkey, Iran
  • AliAsghar Okhovat, Siamak Abdi, Farzad Fatehi* Pages 179-180
  • SeyedAmirHasan Habibi*, Alberto Albanese, Antonio Elia, Paria Arfa Fatollahkhani, Neda Hashemi Pages 181-183
  • Mansooreh Jamshidian Tehrani, Hadi Z. Mehrjardi, Abolfazl Kasaee, Samira Yadegari* Pages 184-186
  • SeyedMohammad Baghbanian*, Maryam Ghasemi, Somayeh Sheidaei, Zohreh Hajheydari Pages 187-189
  • Abdorreza Naser Moghadasi* Pages 190-191